Savage Ancient Seas

Specimens + Life Restorations + Cabinets + Kiosks



Specimens

Archelon, a true giant among giants, is 17 feet between tips of each front paddle. Our specimen of Archelon is the largest turtle ever found, living or extinct. Available only as a floor mount, Archelon is the most popular photo opportunity among visitors.

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Clidastes was the smallest of the mosasaurs and was a surface or shallow water hunter. Possessing a delicate and slim form with an expansion of the neural spines and chevrons near the tip of the tail, Clidastes was an agile and fast swimmer.

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This marine reptile was a cretaceous speedster and its large powerful limbs gave it tremendous maneuverability and speed. The beauty of the animal speaks for itself. Going extinct at the end of the cretaceous, it left no living relatives.

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Discovered in 1867 by a passing pioneer and collected in 1868, this specimen is famous for the historic role it played in launching the "Fossil Wars" of the late 19th Century. The Cope Elasmosaur is available only through our firm TPI.

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Hesperornis was the was the largest of the flightless diving birds of the late Cretaceous. Hesperornis lived in the open ocean, managing to survive among larger predators such as mosasaurs and sharks.

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The Carcharadon megalodon jaw is a jaw restoration with cast teeth. Standing at 8 ½ feet high behind barriers, its impressive size and large teeth provide your museum visitors with a lasting impression and a prime photo opportunity.

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Available exclusively through our firm, five 3D specimens are grouped together in dynamic poses, all but one of them schooling together. The fifth one is being cut out of the group by a giant predatory 3D Xiphactinus.

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Paleospheniscus was a diving marine bird. This early penguin had feathers with a long aftershaft of down and tips for oily, waterproof coating. It may have made 200+ dives a day and was considered the underwater flyer of the Southern Hemisphere.

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One of the largest flying creatures of all time, Pteranodon wingspans reached 33 feet (10 meters). While flying, the wings spanned 24 feet wide! Mounted in a flying or standing skeleton, these Pteranodons form a dramatic group.

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Found over 250 miles from the ancient shoreline, these were strong flyers, living almost exclusively on fish, caught by swooping down to the sea surface and scooping them up in their toothless beaks.

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Top predators of the world’s oceans for the last 20 million years of the Cretaceous period, mosasaurs were an offshoot of the monitor lizard group. Platecarpus was the most abundant. An interesting anatomical feature was the existence of teeth in the palate (pterygoid) of the skull.

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Usually found as partial skeletons ranging from 2' to 4' long, this baby Toxochelys is a rare exception at 9.5" long. Due to predation of modern baby sea turtles, if the situation existed in late Cretaceous, the likelihood of this skeleton being preserved is minuscule. It is a rare find indeed.

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In 1911, C.D. Bunker collected the largest mosasaur ever found in North America. By special agreement, the Bunker Tylosaur was restored, molded, cast and is now a significant Savage Ancient Seas® specimen.

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For 125 years, these denizens of the world’s oceans were displayed as 2D wall mounts. Many years of collecting and study went into the creation of this giant carnivorous fish skeleton. These are the world’s only free standing 3D copies of Xiphactinus. 12.5' (3.8 m) and 17' (5.2 m) long.

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These graphics can help visualize the relative sizes of these specimens and other exhibit components:

LargeSkeletonSizeComparisons.pdf

SmallSkeletonSizeComparisons.pdf

NonSkeletonOptions.pdf

Specimens + Life Restorations + Cabinets + Kiosks



Life Restorations

The head and tentacles of the ammonites extended from their chambered and typically coiled shells. A modern relative of ammonites, the chambered Nautilus, remains the only externally shelled Cephalopod alive today.

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Baculites were a nearly straight ammonite form that lived worldwide throughout the late Cretaceous. Adult Baculites ranged in size from about 7cm - 2m in length (this specimen). The head of the Baculites was based on living cephalopods and calculated for size and appearance.

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Clidastes was the smallest of the mosasaurs and was a surface or shallow water hunter. Possessing a delicate and slim form with an expansion of the neural spines and chevrons near the tip of the tail, Clidastes was an agile and fast swimmer.

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This is a life restoration of a modern coelacanth. The coelacanth is the most well-known lobe-fin-fish (early precursor to tetrapods). There were giant coelacanths - Megalocoelacanthus - living in the Cretaceous Interior Seaway with skulls nearly three feet long.

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One of the largest flying creatures of all time, Pteranodon wingspans reached 33 feet (10 meters). While flying, the wings spanned 24 feet wide! Mounted in a flying position, combine this with a group of a flying or standing skeletons.

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For 125 years, these denizens of the world’s oceans were displayed as 2D wall mounts. Many years of collecting and study went into the creation of this giant carnivorous fish skeleton. These are the world’s only free standing 3D copies of Xiphactinus. This life restoration is 12.5' (3.8 m) long.

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Specimens + Life Restorations + Cabinets + Kiosks



Cabinets

Savage Ancient Seas® offers a wide selection of cabinet-mounted specimens complete with educational materials. Prefabricated with their own interior lighting, our cabinets enable your visitors close-up views of intriguing specimens.
From a personal view of today's living fossil, the coelacanth, to the fossilized remains of a Gillicus fish, the dinner of an ancient predator, your visitors will be fascinated with these denizens of the deep.

Click on the links below to preview our cabinets.
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Ammonites
Coelacanth
Gillicus
Magadiceramus
Protosphyraena Pteranodon
Saurodon leanus
Squalicorax
Xiphactinus

Specimens + Life Restorations + Cabinets + Kiosks



Kiosks

Savage Ancient Seas® combines fossil specimens with explanations of important concepts regarding the Western Interior Seaway into attractive and informative kiosks.

With up to seven kiosks to choose from, Savage Ancient Seas® meets your institution's educational directive while adapting to your exhibition space. Totally prefabricated, our staff assists with setup.

Click on the links below to preview our kiosks.
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What Was the Savage Ancient Sea?
This kiosk includes touch fossil specimens for a hands on interactive experience for your visitors.
What Were These Sediments?
Learn about how the Niobrara Chalk was formed millions of years ago.
Are These Real?
This kiosk explains the process for molding and casting fossil specimens to make exact duplicate copies for exhibit.
Where Did They Go?
Extinction. What happened during the Cretaceous? What are the current theories?
What Is A Shallow Seaway?
Learn about the differences between the Western Interior Seaway of the Cretaceous times versus modern day oceans.
Who Survived?
What happened to all the animals from the Cretaceous? Which ones have living relatives today?
What Did They Eat?
The food web of the seaway. Life in this dangerous ocean revolved around eating or being eaten!
 

Specimens + Life Restorations + Cabinets + Kiosks


 
Catalog
 

For your convenience, we have placed the Savage Ancient Seas® catalog online as a .pdf so you can easily view or print it.

Savage Ancient Seas Catalog

 
Host Resources
 

Below are resources meant to assist host institutions in the promotion and program delivery relavant to Savage Ancient Seas.

Educator Resources

Educator Guide

Specimens Handout

Educational Standards

Images

Isolated Specimen Images

Past Exhibit Photos

Other Resources

Sample Floor Plans

Sample Press Releases

Sample Brochures

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Savage Ancient Seas® is a part of Triebold Paleontology, Inc., headquartered in the Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center Copyrights © Triebold Paleontology, Inc. 2016, Proud members of the Association of Applied Paleontological Sciences.